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A Self-Heating Greenhouse in the Pacific Northwest

A Self-Heating Greenhouse in the Pacific Northwest

Ceres Greenhouse owner, Stephen Butler, will explain how the GAHT® (Ground to Air Heat Transfer) System operates in the moist climate of the Pacific Northwest. Learn how a GAHT® System can heat and cool your greenhouse using the temperature of the soil underneath.

To learn more, visit https://www.ceresgs.com/?utm_source=youtube&utm_medium=youtube_description&utm_campaign=youtube_organic&utm_content=gaht_system_pnw

00:04
all righty the GAHT® system as you know as
00:08
two layers we’ve got the one layer of
00:11
tubes down at four feet the second layer
00:13
at two feet and you catch the big tubes
00:18
in the back that take the air off from
00:20
near the roof and then the smaller tubes
00:24
up here in front that push the air out and
00:29
so we were curious in the summers to how
00:33
it actually worked so once we finally
00:35
got things hooked up and ready we
00:38
started running it on some fairly warm
00:39
days to actually push the heat from
00:41
inside the greenhouse down into the rock
00:44
and we discovered that it has a very
00:48
good air conditioner to keep the
00:52
greenhouse cooler in the summer
00:54
occasionally the exhaust had to kick
00:57
on to produce a little extra cooling
01:00
when we got up above I think I have it
01:02
set at 85 degrees for that and then as
01:07
we cooled down an exhaust fan no longer
01:09
working during the day we started
01:11
getting some of the colder nights here
01:13
as we said earlier we’ve played
01:16
with freezing a few times probably 30 or 29
01:21
degrees something like that I’ve noticed
01:25
is the at nighttime it’s usually still
01:29
above 50 degrees by midnight and then
01:32
shortly after midnight I’ve seen that
01:34
occasionally dropped down 49 to 48 I think
01:39
a coldest morning I saw was 47 and we’ve
01:43
got the GAHT® system turned off right now
01:44
otherwise you’d be hearing that low
01:46
Rumble in the background but what we
01:50
found is it is picking that heat up from
01:52
down below and keeping this thing fairly
01:56
warm throughout the day now on these
01:59
cold wintery days where in the North
02:02
West were famous for the liquid sunshine
02:05
except it usually is not too much
02:07
sunshine with the liquid but I’ve
02:11
noticed that that maybe the GAHT® will run
02:12
all day long pulling the heat up out of
02:16
the ground
02:17
the other thing we’ve I’ve noticed is
02:19
that if it’s really humid in here and
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we’ve got a nice warm day I can pick a
02:25
lot of humidity up and dump it down into
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the rocks and actually warm those rocks
02:30
up and then recapture that heat at night
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they’ve actually comes back and keeps
02:36
the greenhouse a little warmer at night
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I think right now we’re at 56 degrees
02:43
according to that one thermometer over
02:46
there and outside is what mid-40s right
02:49
now so there are times where you know
02:57
outside catches up with the greenhouse
02:59
and stuff but when it gets cold outside
03:02
this stays you know 10 to 15 even 20
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degrees warmer than the outside in
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the early morning pre-dawn hours

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Written by Aleksandar

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Comments

  1. I have a 6×8 greenhouse. I use a 20 gallon water heater and water pump which goes through a auto heater radiator with a radiator cooling fans blowing and sucking both sides to get enough air flow, which needs dc power supply to run the fans. I have a thermostat which turn the fans and pump off and on when it reaches a certain temperature i've set. The cost is very small I have notice very little change in electric cost. I keep it 60 degreez all winter long. I have a sensor in greenhouse that i can read the temp just to check if its working fine. Been using this for several years now.

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