in

A Passive Solar Greenhouse – In the Alaska Garden with Heidi Rader

A Passive Solar Greenhouse - In the Alaska Garden with Heidi Rader



In this video, Emily Garrity, owner of Twitter Creek Gardens in Homer, Alaska gives us a tour of her passive solar greenhouse and describes what she uses it for.

For more information:
http://www.twittercreekgardens.com

Additional resources:

Solar Design Manual
http://cespubs.uaf.edu/index.php/download_file/1483/

Passive Solar Heating: An Energy Factsheet
http://cespubs.uaf.edu/index.php/download_file/1486/

Greenhouses for Homeowners and Gardeners
http://cespubs.uaf.edu/order-publication/?c=NRAES-00137

Greenhouses for Home Gardeners in Alaska
http://cespubs.uaf.edu/index.php/download_file/1240/

Controlling the Greenhouse Environment
http://cespubs.uaf.edu/index.php/download_file/1174/

source

UAFExtension

Report

What do you think?

Hero

Written by Aleksandar

Video MakerContent AuthorYears Of Membership

Comments

  1. Just some food for thought lol … we're trying to incorporate everything into one, as in we grow crops, raise quail & have a worm bin going. between the quail & worms, they are processing most of our organic waste, the quail manure goes into the worms, we get beautiful castings & tea. Just getting ready to put the plastic back on our green house, gonna bring all that in around the aquaponics table, hopefully the plan is the system will also produce heat for me …. planning on getting some chickens going to.

    I think that is why farmers of the past had their house about their livestock …. free heat ! I could see rabbits working well as their manure can be used immediately for fertilizer.

  2. how air tight is the building? and few inches of foam under the slab and around the outside of dug-in walls would help to maintain the heat for longer by not allowing the ground to sap the stored heat in the concrete, maybe be able to net a slightly longer shoulder

  3. You don't have pony walls in your greenhouse. Pony walls bear the weight of the floor above. You're just letting everyone know that they should ignore you because you don't know the meaning of the words coming out of your mouth.

  4. Please consider using black paint to coat surfaces that the sun shines on within your greenhouse. The color black absorbs and retains far more energy from the sun in the form of heat than any other color. Black stones and black water containers are particularly good at holding heat. Love the greenhouse, excellent work!

  5. Thank you so much for a video which gets straight to the point without "fluff chatter" and "annoying background music" that drowns out the speaker!!!!! Well done video! And I learned a thing or two!!!

  6. Have you considered <<grounding << your planters..ie connecting a wire to a rod in the Ground..I have heard that <<grounded<< planters do better than off-ground, ungrounded planters. Maybe Check into it.

  7. This is a basic greenhouse. Would be far better with a passive heat storage system (NOT the same as passive solar) using the earth around it. Homer is a tough situation because there aren’t many sunny days, winter OR summer.

  8. Your wood stove is archaic. Concrete walls are strong but of no real value as insulation or heat sink. Look at the rocket stove and also aircrete. Super insulating aircrete and the most economical heating available. With your temps, heating year round would require very little wood. Check out "Honeydo Carpenter" on Youtube.

  9. Doorways need a “cold trap”. Think of when you open a fridge or freezer…the cold air is denser…it spills out like a waterfall.
    It is known that depressions and hills create “microclimates” outside. The greenhouse in this video is certainly doing the same thing!
    The door and stairs are creating excellent cold air spillage down to the floor level of the greenhouse. The air is pooling there and reducing the warmth of the grow beds and their soil.
    A “cold trap” would be an enclosed foyer at a level LOWER than the entry into the greenhouse. The coldest air is thus “trapped” in the foyer instead of being allowed to spill right down the inner greenhouse stairs. It thus modifies the “microclimate” in the greenhouse by reducing loss of heat.
    The concrete walls, I noticed, do not have insulation, which is another heat sink for the greenhouse. That will help cooling a bit in the summer, but it does not aid warming in the winter. All the concrete should have closed cell insulation with black bags or drums to hold water.
    They are not using the space effectively, either. Rotating tower gardens would make MUCH better use of the vertical space available.
    For a place that gets as cold as Alaska does, I would certainly build a rocket mass heater. The gas chamber can go over 1000 degrees F, and the bench holds temperature overnight. The extreme heat of the gasification chamber could be used to passively drive a radiator system to heat water stored in drums.
    The greenhouse is really nice…I hope they take some measure to improve it!

  10. Two layers of pre-measured and pre-cut and pre-chemically strenghtened glass that are flexible when very thin and can be folded like a ribbon (mid-1960s technology that all greenhouse owners should know, they are also used to make flexible glass springs!) but this time it will be thick (or glass ceramic panes). 2 layers of pre-measured and pre-cut and pre-chemically strenghtened glass (or glass ceramic panes) were used with a pre-measured and pre-cut silicone rubber interlayer in between them and bonded together with a dissolved silicone resin plastic. Neither extreme heat or extreme cold will past through the silicone rubber. This will be your outer layer greenhouse glass which will be bolted and glued air-tight and water-tight with the same dissolved silicone resin plastic. The second inner layer with be a single layer of pre-measured and pre-cut and pre-chemically strenghtened glass (or glass ceramic) that will be bolted and sealed with the same dissolved silicone resin plastic. Them the high-strenght military grade metal frame of the greenhouse on the outside and inside will be ELECTROSTATICALLY SPRAYED with a mixture of pre-dissolved silicone rubber-resin plastic coating to prevent heat and cold transmission from the outside to the inside. Then the space between the two greenhouse structures will be filled with pure carbon dioxide that will absorb and store the Sun's heat which will be gradually transmitted through the inner pre-measured and pre-cut and pre-chemically strenghtened glass panes to provide warmth for the greenhouse.

    In Siberia we use the 2 layers of pre-measured and pre-cut and pre-chemically strenghtened glass were used with a pre-measured and pre-cut silicone rubber interlayer in between them and bonded together with a dissolved silicone resin plastic and the high-strenght military grade metal frame of the greenhouse on the outside and inside will be ELECTROSTATICALLY SPRAYED with a mixture of pre-dissolved silicone rubber-resin plastic coating to prevent heat and cold transmission from the outside to the inside. And inside are tanks made out out pre-measured and pre-cut and pre-chemically strenghtened pyrex glass tanks (or glass ceramic tanks) or yrttia-stabilized zirconia glass fiber reinforced KAPTON plastic tanks, sealed and contains BRINE that absorbs the Sun's heat until it reaches near boiling point. The huge tanks will be able to capture store enough heat to be dissipated to keep the greenhouse safely warm for both plants and humans and animals.

    Other greenhouses uses the 2 layers of pre-measured and pre-cut and pre-chemically strenghtened glass (or glass ceramic panes) were used with a pre-measured and pre-cut silicone rubber interlayer in between them and bonded together with a dissolved silicone resin plastic. Neither extreme heat or extreme cold will past through the silicone rubber. But to grow also fast growing coppiced and/or pollarded willow trees or calliandra calothyrus trees for the Jean Pain Compost Method to simultaneously produce heat for heating through the winter through the compost fermentation process and produce carbon dioxide to help feed the plants (plants inhales carbon dioxide and exhales oxygen) and provide fertilizer once the compost has transformed itself into humus to be used as fertilizer.

    http://journeytoforever.org/biofuel_library/methane_pain.
    html https://www.google.com/search?biw=1600&bih=757&sxsrf=ACYBGNRGXUQSzIjmaC1_yT1p-zZ8Sq3LYA%3A1572129885581&ei=Xcy0XdqMI5at0PEPyJSZ-Ao&q=jean+pain+king+of+green+gold&oq=Jea&gs_l=psy-ab.1.0.35i39j0l7j0i131j0.1286847.1289501..1291798…1.2..2.78.483.7……0….1..gws-wiz…..10..0i71j35i362i39.xZv9k56UZBQ

    In the Siberian Arctic circle however, the greenhouses are vastly different. They use 2 layers of yrttia-stabilized zirconia glass fiber reinforced silicone rubber-silicone resin plastic panels with an interlayer of high-military grade strength stainless steel welded and interwoven silicone rubber over a greenhouse walls and roofs made out of Riveted bridge deck for flooringhttp://ohiogratings.com/Content/pdfs/product/bridge_brochure.pdf .

Loading…

0
Best Aquarium Fish for beginners

Best Aquarium Fish for beginners

Hoop House Construction, Part 1 of 3: Types of Hoop House Structures

Hoop House Construction, Part 1 of 3: Types of Hoop House Structures